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Helping Patients Manage Their Weight for Better Health

Women joggingLiving with obesity can lead to chronic health issues affecting the heart and lungs. The purpose of the Bariatric Care Center at Deborah Heart and Lung Center, a partnership program with the Garden State Bariatric Center, is to help patients avoid cardiopulmonary complications.

Besides wanting to slim down and look better, managing obesity can have a profound impact on chronic health issues. Being overweight can contribute to many debilitating health problems including:

  • Heart disease, or coronary artery disease
  • High blood pressure, or hypertension
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Sleep apnea
  • Stroke
  • Gallbladder disease
  • Many types of cancer
  • Issues in the hips, knees, feet, and other joints
  • Depression and anxiety

For some patients, losing enough weight is simply a matter of being disciplined in adopting a new lifestyle of healthy eating habits and increased exercise. This may include meeting with a nutritionist, working out with a trainer, counseling, and other strategies.

In cases where non-surgical weight management programs are not effective, bariatric surgery may be necessary. The term bariatric surgery encompasses several surgical procedures performed on the stomach or intestines. These procedures work by either reducing the size of the stomach, causing the patient to feel full on less food, or by rerouting the digestive tract so that food bypasses part of the digestive process. Surgical outcomes are generally positive, allowing patients to lose a substantial amount of weight in a healthy way.

Since obesity leads to so many chronic health issues, Deborah Heart and Lung Center has partnered with Garden State Bariatric Center to offer expert bariatric surgery at the Hospital. Post-surgery, patients work with a team of nutrition and exercise specialists to help with the transition during the weight loss process.

Fast Facts
  • Bariatric surgery patients can reduce their risk of heart attack by up to 40% and their risk of stroke by up to 42% over a 10-year span.
  • Patients with Type 2 diabetes often report complete remission.