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Gastric Bypass Surgery

Gastric BypassGastric bypass, also called Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, is a type of weight-loss surgery that involves creating a small pouch from the stomach and connecting the newly created pouch directly to the small intestine. After gastric bypass, swallowed food will go into this small pouch of stomach and then directly into the small intestine, thereby bypassing most of the stomach and the first section of the small intestine.


How does it work?

The surgery takes, on average, about two hours. Most patients are in the hospital 2-3 days. The surgery involves reducing the size of the stomach from 32 ounces to about 2 ounces. In addition, the intestines are re-routed to decrease the absorption of food and re-attached to the new, smaller stomach.

The weight loss after gastric bypass tends to be more rapid than after gastric banding.


Am I a good candidate for treatment?

Gastric bypass surgery may be an option for patients:

  • With a BMI of 40 or higher
  • With a BMI of 35 to 39.9 who also have serious weight-related comorbidities such as diabetes, hypertension, or sleep apnea

Gastric bypass isn’t for everyone who is severely overweight. Patients will have an extensive screening process to see if they qualify.


What can I expect after treatment?

Patients will likely have many restrictions or limits on how much and what they can eat and drink. Vitamin and mineral supplementation is also essential after surgery.

After surgery, patients should have frequent medical checkups to monitor their health, including laboratory testing, bloodwork and various exams.

Some changes that may occur within the first six months after surgery include:

  • Body aches
  • Feeling tired, as if you have the flu
  • Feeling cold
  • Dry skin
  • Hair thinning and hair loss
  • Mood changes